Otago University Press (165)

The Gorse Blooms Pale

ISBN: 9781877372421

Author: Dan Davin    Publisher: Otago University Press

Dan Davin, one of New Zealand’s acknowledged masters of the short story, was born in Invercargill in 1913. The Gorse Blooms Pale gathers together twenty-six s...


Dan Davin, one of New Zealand’s acknowledged masters of the short story, was born in Invercargill in 1913. The Gorse Blooms Pale gathers together twenty-six stories and a selection of poems reflecting his experiences while growing up in an Irish–New Zealand family in Southland. Comic, haunting, poetic, profound and lyrical, the stories have a regional flavour quite unlike any other body of work in New Zealand literature. They insightfully capture the character of a close-knit rural community and its post-British social relationships and tribulations, with a flair equal to such other New Zealand writers as Sargeson, Frame, Middleton or Marshall. The Gorse Blooms Pale is a rare treasure in the landscape of twentieth-century New Zealand literature.


Bind: hardback


Pages: 304


Dimensions: 138 x 210 mm


$45.00
Landfall 240

ISBN: 9781988592633

Publisher: Otago University Press

FEATURED ARTISTS Scott Eady, Yonel Watene, Fatu Feu`u AWARDS & COMPETITIONS Results and winning essay from the: • Landfall Essay Competition 2020 • Caselbe...


FEATURED ARTISTS Scott Eady, Yonel Watene, Fatu Feu`u AWARDS & COMPETITIONS Results and winning essay from the: • Landfall Essay Competition 2020 • Caselberg Trust International Poetry Prize 2020 • Frank Sargeson Prize 2020 WRITERS John Allison, Nick Ascroft, Wanda Baker, Peter Belton, Victor Billot, Ella Borrie, Cindy Botha, Liz Breslin, Brent Cantwell, Marisa Cappetta, Catherine Chidgey, Jennifer Compton, Lynn Davidson, Breton Dukes, Norman Franke, Jasmine Gallagher, Giles Graham, Charlotte Grimshaw, Rebecca Hawkes, Nathaniel Herz-Edinger, Zoe Higgins, Gail Ingram, Ash Davida Jane, Pippi Jean, Stacey Kokaua, A.M. McKinnon, Cilla McQueen, Alice Miller, Jessica Le Bas, Art Nahill, Jilly O’Brien, Chris Parsons, Sarah Paterson, Robyn Maree Pickens, Angela Pope, Sugu Pillay, essa may ranapiri, Vaughan Rapatahana, Alan Roddick, Ruth Russ, Lynda Scott Araya, Tracey Slaughter, Matafanua Tamatoa, Jessica Thompson-Carr, Catherine Trundle, Chris Tse, Iain Twiddy, Oscar Upperton, Tim Upperton, Dunstan Ward, Harris Williamson, Sharni Wilson, Sophia Wilson, Anna Woods REVIEWS Landfall Review Online: books recently reviewed. And: JAMES NORCLIFFE on Eileen Duggan Selected Poems, ed. Peter Whiteford; Denis Glover Selected Poems, ed. Bill Manhire; and R.A.K. Mason: Uncollected Poems, ed. Roger Hickin CATHERINE ROBERTSON on All the Way to Summer: Stories of love and longing by Fiona Kidman GIOVANNI TISO on Not in Narrow Seas: The economic history of Aotearoa New Zealand by Brian Easton GENEVIEVE SCANLAN on Mezzaluna by Michele Leggott CHRIS TSE on How to Be Old by Rachel McAlpine and The Lifers by Michael Steven


Bind: paperback


Pages: 208


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 15-11-2020


$30.00
The Handbook of New Zealand Mammals

ISBN: 9781988592589

Authors: Carolyn King, David Forsyth    Publisher: Otago University Press

The Handbook of New Zealand Mammals is the only definitive reference on all the land-breeding mammals recorded in the New Zealand region (including the New Zeal...


The Handbook of New Zealand Mammals is the only definitive reference on all the land-breeding mammals recorded in the New Zealand region (including the New Zealand sector of Antarctica). It lists 65 species, including native and exotic, wild and feral, living and extinct, residents, vagrants and failed introductions. It describes their history, biology and ecology, and brings together comprehensive and detailed information gathered from widely scattered or previously unpublished sources. The description of each species is arranged under standardised headings for easy reference. Because the only native land-breeding mammals in New Zealand are bats and seals, the great majority of the modern mammal fauna comprises introduced species, whose arrival has had profound effects both for themselves and for the native fauna and flora. The book details changes in numbers and distribution for the native species, and for the arrivals it summarises changes in habitat, diet, numbers and size in comparison with their ancestral stocks, and some of the problems they present to resource managers. For this third edition, the text and references have been completely updated and reorganised into Family chapters. The colour section includes 14 pages of artwork showing all the species described and their main variations, plus two pages of maps.


Bind: hardback


Pages: 576


Dimensions: 270 x 210 mm


Publication Date: 11-01-2021


$160.00
The Moon in a Bowl of Water

ISBN: 9781988531540

Author: Michael Harlow    Publisher: Otago University Press

Bound together by myth and music, Michael Harlow's The Moon in a Bowl of Water is a stunning new collection from a poet in complete control of his craft. Harlow...


Bound together by myth and music, Michael Harlow's The Moon in a Bowl of Water is a stunning new collection from a poet in complete control of his craft. Harlow is the maestro of the prose poem. Here he presents a collection of small human journeys, with a strong emphasis on narrative. The work is consciously rooted in Greek mythology and in the idea of storytelling as a continuous river, flowing from the ancients to the present, telling one story on the surface, but carrying in its depths the glints of ancient archetypes, symbols and myths. Each poem is studded with associations that hark back millennia. Harlow delights in the airiness of the imagination and the magic of transformation, especially through the power of language. Words become `thought-birds' that can be caged, coaxed to sing, or allowed to fly, and the poems' sonic after-effects echo and re-echo in the reader's mind and ear.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 80


Dimensions: 165 x 235 mm


Tag: Poetry
$27.50
Landfall 235

ISBN: 9781988531243

Publisher: Otago University Press

AWARDS & COMPETITIONS Results and winning essays from the 2018 Charles Brasch Young Writers’ Award, and judge’s report by Emma Neale. WRITERS Aimee-Jane And...


AWARDS & COMPETITIONS Results and winning essays from the 2018 Charles Brasch Young Writers’ Award, and judge’s report by Emma Neale. WRITERS Aimee-Jane Anderson-O’Connor, Nick Ascroft, Joseph Barbon, Airini Beautrais, Tony Beyer, Mark Broatch, Danny Bultitude, Brent Cantwell, Rachel Connor, Ruth Corkill, Mark Edgecombe, Lynley Edmeades, Johanna Emeney, Bonnie Etherington, Jess Fiebig, Meagan France, Kim Fulton, Isabel Haarhaus, Bernadette Hall, Michael Hall, Rebecca Hawkes, Aaron Horrell, Jac Jenkins, Erik Kennedy, Brent Kininmont, Wen-Juenn Lee, Zoë Meager, Alice Miller, Dave Moore, Art Nahill, Janet Newman, Charles Olsen, Joanna Preston, Jessie Puru, Jeremy Roberts, Derek Schulz, Sarah Scott, Charlotte Simmonds, Tracey Slaughter, Elizabeth Smither, Rachael Taylor, Lynette Thorstensen, James Tremlett, Tam Vosper, Dunstan Ward, Susan Wardell, Sugar Magnolia Wilson REVIEWS Landfall Review Online: books recently reviewed Chris Else on Moonshine Eggs by Russell Haley Stephanie Johnson on Decline and Fall on Savage Street by Fiona Farrell Owen Marshall on Tess by Kirsten McDougall Chris Tse on What Is Left Behind by Tom Weston; Rumpelstiltskin Blues by John Adams; Tales of the Waihorotiu by Carin Smeaton Ray Grover on Phoney Wars: New Zealand society in the Second World War by Stevan Eldred-Grigg with Hugh Eldred-Grigg Genevieve Scanlan on Hoard by Fleur Adcock; Field Notes by Mary Cresswell; Luminescent by Nina Powles Philip Temple on Edmund Hillary: A biography by Michael Gill Tom Brooking on Tōtara: A natural and cultural history by Philip Simpson Published with the assistance of Creative New Zealand


Bind: paperback


Dimensions: 165 x 215 mm


Publication Date: 01-05-2018


$30.00
Doctors in Denial : The forgotten women in the 'unfortunate experiment'

ISBN: 9780947522438

Author: Ronald Jones    Publisher: Otago University Press

When Dr Ron Jones joined the staff of National Women’s Hospital in Auckland in 1973 as a junior obstetrician and gynaecologist, Professor Herbert Green’s st...


When Dr Ron Jones joined the staff of National Women’s Hospital in Auckland in 1973 as a junior obstetrician and gynaecologist, Professor Herbert Green’s study into the natural history of carcinoma in-situ of the cervix (CIS) – later called ‘the unfortunate experiment’ – had been in progress for seven years. By the mid-1960s there was almost universal agreement among gynaecologists and pathologists worldwide that CIS was a precursor of cancer, requiring complete removal. Green, however, believed otherwise, and embarked on a study of women with CIS, without their consent, that involved merely observing, rather than definitively treating them. Many women subsequently developed cancer and some died. In 1984 Jones and senior colleagues Dr Bill McIndoe and Dr Jock McLean published a scientific paper that exposed the truth, and the disastrous outcome of Green’s experiment. In a public inquiry in 1987 Judge Sylvia Cartwright observed that an unethical experiment had been carried out in large numbers of women for over 20 years. Since that time there have been attempts to cast Green’s work in a more generous light. This rewriting of history has spurred Ron Jones to set the record straight by telling his personal story: a story of the unnecessary suffering of countless women, a story of professional arrogance and misplaced loyalties, and a story of doctors in denial of the truth.


Bind: paperback


Pages: 264


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 20-02-2017


$39.95
Nga Kete Matauranga Maori Scholars At The Research Interface

ISBN: 9781988592558

Authors: Jacinta Ruru, Linda Waimarie Nikora    Publisher: Otago University Press

In this beautiful and transformative book, 24 Māori academics share their personal journeys, revealing what being Māori has meant for them in their work. Thei...


In this beautiful and transformative book, 24 Māori academics share their personal journeys, revealing what being Māori has meant for them in their work. Their perspectives provide insight for all New Zealanders into how mātauranga is positively influencing the Westerndominated disciplines of knowledge in the research sector. It is a shameful fact, says co-editor Jacinta Ruru in her introduction to Ngā Kete Mātauranga, that in 2020, only about 5 percent of academic staff at universities in Aotearoa New Zealand are Māori. Tertiary institutions have for the most part been hostile places for Indigenous students and staff, and this book is an important call for action. ‘It is well past time that our country seriously commits to decolonising the tertiary workforce, curriculum and research agenda,’ writes Professor Ruru. The book demonstrates the power, energy and diversity that can be brought out into the world by Māori scholars working both comfortably and uncomfortably from within, without and across diverse academic disciplines and mātauranga Māori. – Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith These deeply personal stories provide a portal into the te ao Māori world, which many outside it seek to understand, but struggle to find a frame in which to do so. The abstract concept of decolonising the tertiary workforce is brought to life and given meaning by these kōrero of strength, where the authors display courage and vision from within an environment so often hostile to Indigenous ways of knowing. Read it, be inspired, and welcome this refreshingly written challenge to embrace mātauranga Māori and build a stronger academy. – Professor Juliet A. Gerrard, Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor Kaitohutohu Mātanga Pūtaiao Matua ki te Pirimia


Pages: 304


Dimensions: 230 x 260 mm


$60.00
To The Mountains

ISBN: 9781988531205

Authors: Laurence Fearnley, Paul Hersey    Publisher: Otago University Press

The air temperature was probably -35 degrees Celsius with wind chill. We couldn’t stand still for long. Our brains felt taxed and our bodies were running on e...


The air temperature was probably -35 degrees Celsius with wind chill. We couldn’t stand still for long. Our brains felt taxed and our bodies were running on empty. On the Football Field not far from the summit, Sue discovered a square of chocolate. We shared it, telling our bodies we didn’t need more. As we continued the descent, the air warmed and filled with oxygen. We began to encounter climbers heading up. Most knew who we were, incredulously asking: ‘are you the girls who slept on the summit’? – Karen McNeill, ‘A Ridge Too Far: The first female ascent of Denali’s Cassin Ridge’ A schoolgirl races from class to join a weekend trip to the hills. A mountaineering guide recalls his first weeks on the job during the 1920s. A young climber is shown the best route over the Main Divide by a big bull thar. A climbing party is bombarded by falling rock when Ruapehu suddenly erupts. A mountaineer pays tribute to the Māori guides from south Westland, while a fighter pilot tries to recapture an ascent of the Minarets from his tent in Nigeria during World War II. From the Darrans of Fiordland to Denali in Alaska, New Zealand climbers, both experienced and recreational, have captured their alpine experience in letters, journals, articles, memoirs, poems and novels. Drawing on 150 years of published and unpublished material, Laurence Fearnley and Paul Hersey, two top contemporary authors, have compiled a wide-ranging, fascinating and moving glimpse into New Zealand’s mountaineering culture and the people who write about it.


Bind: hardback


Pages: 372


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


Publication Date: 12-06-2018


$45.00
Artefacts of Encounter

ISBN: 9781877578694

Author: Nicholas Thomas    Publisher: Otago University Press

The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him ar...


The Pacific artefacts and works of art collected during the three voyages of Captain James Cook and the navigators, traders and missionaries who followed him are of foundational importance for the study of art and culture in Oceania. These collections are representative not only of technologies or belief systems but of indigenous cultures at the formative stages of their modern histories, and exemplify Islanders’ institutions, cosmologies and social relationships. Recently, scholars from the Pacific and further afield, working with Pacific artefacts at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Cambridge (MAA), have set out to challenge and rethink some longstanding assumptions on their significance. The Cook voyage collection at the MAA is among the four or five most important in the world, containing over 200 of the 2000-odd objects with Cook voyage provenance that are dispersed throughout the world. The collection includes some 100 artefacts dating from Cook’s first voyage. This stunning book catalogues this collection, and its cutting-edge scholarship sheds new light on the significance of many artefacts of encounter. • Hundreds of sumptuous photographs of artefacts collected on the voyages of Captain Cook and by traders and missionaries who followed him • Cutting-edge scholarship • Large-format jacketed hardback


Bind: hardback


Pages: 348


Dimensions: 285 x 250 mm


Publication Date: 17-06-2016


Tag: History
$70.00
Edgeland

ISBN: 9781988531274

Author: David Eggleton    Publisher: Otago University Press

The poetry in David Eggleton’s new collection possesses an intensity and driven energy, using the poet’s recognisable signature oratory voice, strong in bea...


The poetry in David Eggleton’s new collection possesses an intensity and driven energy, using the poet’s recognisable signature oratory voice, strong in beat and measure, rooted in rich traditions of chant, lament and ode. Mashing together the lyrical and the slangy, celebrating local vernaculars while simultaneously plugged in to a global zeitgeist of technobabble and fake news, Eggleton recycles and ‘repurposes’ high visual culture and demotic aural culture. Edgeland offers a tragicomic and surreal skewering of the cons, swindles, posturings and flaws of damaged people on the make, dislocating the reader with high speed jinks and swerves. A satirical eye interrogates ‘data’, media bilge, opinion, social change, extreme experience, and worst-case-scenario extrapolations. A menagerie of vivid characters burst off the page – including the man who mistook the moon for a candy bar, instigators, prestidigitators, procurators, promulgators, Zorro and Governor Grey – alongside a survey of 35 types of beard, an ode to ooze, metadada, Gordon Ramsay’s pan-sizzled bull’s pizzle, a Baxterian moa, and various other waka jumpers hailing from Jafaville to Jack’s Blowhole. Edgeland is a dazzling display of polychromatic virtuosity, teeming with irrepressible wordplay, startling imagery and anarchic wit, from one of New Zealand’s best-loved poets


Bind: paperback


Pages: 112


Dimensions: 150 x 230 mm


$27.50
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